Cultural Heritage Sites In Malaysia

March 30, 2011 at 12:00 pm

A recent article about Indonesia registering three cultural heritage sites at UNESCO got me thinking about the entire issue. Just how many sites does Malaysia have on UNESCO? Can you name some of them? Let us see.

1. Georgetown and Malacca
2. Gunung Mulu National Park
3. Kinabalu National Park

A complete list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites are available HERE, for those of you who want to know more about the various interesting places the world has to offer.

Penang is jointly listed with Malacca as a UNESCO World Heritage Site

An interesting thing that Indonesia has registered with UNESCO in the past includes intangible heritage sites, such as Indonesian puppets (2003), Indonesian ceremonial knives (2005), Indonesian Batiks (2009) and Indonesian angklung (2010). This time Indonesia has added Balinese traditional dance, Noken handicraft and Taman Mini Indonesia Indah (TMII).

Remember the hoopla over the dance a couple of months back? Indonesians got quite riled up when a tourism program about Malaysia included a Balinese dance which was credited to Malaysia. Well, perhaps that is why Indonesia chose to register it. In all honesty, we thought that it was just a misunderstanding.

So people, should Malaysia follow in Indonesia’s footsteps and register OUR own intangible heritage sites? What would we register, Nasi Lemak? Malaysian Songket? Or perhaps Chingay performance?

Tell us what YOU think.

Read the full article below:

Indonesia has registered three intangible cultural heritage sites, namely Balinese traditional dance, Noken handicraft and Taman Mini Indonesia Indah (TMII), at the United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization, an official said.

“The Minister of Culture and Tourism today registered the three sites to UNESCO to preserve Indonesian culture,” Jero Wacik, Minister of Culture and Tourism, was quoted by Antara news agency as saying here Monday.

Jero said by the addition of the three heritage sites, Indonesia had added a number of intangible cultural heritage sites, such as Indonesian puppets (2003), Indonesian ceremonial knives (2005), Indonesian Batiks (2009) and Indonesian angklung (2010).

He further said that the more cultural heritage sites are recognized by UNESCO created higher pride for the people in preserving the cultural sites in Indonesia.

On the occasion, he also expressed pessimism in registering all Indonesian cultural heritage sites to UNESCO due to the limited financial factor.

“Thousands of people have been involved in the registration of the three sites, so there must be more people and money to spend in registering all the sites of Indonesian cultural heritage since we have plenty of them ,” he said.

Those three intangible cultural heritage sites are involved in the representative List of Intangible Cultural Heritages (Balinese traditional dances), Urgent Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage (Noken handicraft) and Best Practice of Intangible Cultural Heritages (TMII).

Source: Bernama

One Response

  1. bob says:

    thanxz this website has helped me heeps :)

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